University of Louisville

UofL Today Radio Show Features Dataseam and Important Cancer Research

Dataseam CEO Brian Gupton and UofL Brown Cancer Center Deputy Director, Dr. John Trent, discuss Dataseam’s value providing computers to school classrooms across Kentucky while delivering computer power to cancer researchers at UofL. The story is the first feature segment on UofL Today with Mark Hebert radio show.

Listen to the story: UofL Today with Mark Hebert: Dataseam/Cancer Research.

Originally aired on FM 93.9, March 12, 2018.

DataseamScholars at the University of Louisville – Apply Today

The DataseamScholars Program offers students from Participating Dataseam School Districts an opportunity to pursue and pay for college education in high-paying growth jobs. Explore the education programs at the University of Louisville today.  Take advantage of the ways to cover student costs, including the DataseamScholars Program.

DataseamScholars at the University of Louisville receive a $2,000 per year renewable scholarship to pursue studies in Science, Technology, Engineering or Math studies.

Application deadline is January 8, 2018.

The University of Louisville is a state-supported research university located in Kentucky’s largest metropolitan area. The University has three campuses. The 287-acre Belknap Campus is three miles from downtown Louisville and houses seven of the university’s 12 colleges and schools.

Where The Rubber Meets The Road.

(Williamsburg, KY) – The DataseamGrid is comprised of thousands of computers working 24-hours a day to help researchers find new treatments for cancer. We talk about thousands of teachers benefiting from Dataseam workshops. We point with pride to industry-standard Certified Technicians supporting school technology. We highlight Dataseam Scholarships supporting college students. Sometimes it is nice to look at what these students have accomplished. Craig Roaden – In His Own Words.

My name is Craig Roaden. I am a graduate of Whitley County High School and the University of Louisville. I am currently employed as a Process Technician for Michelin North America. I work at Michelin’s premier facility for cutting-edge Ultrahigh Performance tirelines in Greenville, South Carolina. I could not have achieved these feats and paved a way for a rewarding future without the help of Dataseam initiatives and scholarship programs. These opportunities have allowed me to embrace new technologies and prepare myself for the advancements that the workforce demands.

The Dataseam Scholars program at the University of Louisville helps students from participating school districts chase their dreams.  Apply Today.

Dataseam supports many Kentucky high schools with grants and funding to promote interest of students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Our school system (grade schools to high school) has used this funding to update our classrooms and integrate new technologies and computer systems into our curriculum. I had personal involvement taking computer programing and multimedia applications courses my senior year. I am a firm believer that exposing students to technology and STEM career possibilities will motivate them to succeed in their careers and higher education goals. Having access to these databases and equipment helped affirm my choice to seek higher education in engineering. The support from my family and foundations in our community and school system helped me become an Eagle Scout, Kentucky Governor Scholar, Commonwealth Ambassador, and a member of the Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels all before high school graduation.

As a high school scholar in Kentucky, Dataseam opened many doors for my future. Dataseam provides scholarships for students, like me, to help educate themselves in STEM fields. With the scholarship assistance from Dataseam, I was able to financially afford to remain in-state and attend the University of Louisville J.B. Speed School of Engineering. Remaining in-state allowed me to stay close to my family and support Kentucky’s universities. With the help and support of Dataseam’s presence at UofL, I was offered a variety of networking among faculty, staff, and provosts across the UofL campus I would not have otherwise known. These relationships helped blossom in my involvement in many campus societies and groups including the Golden Key Honor Society, National Society of Collegiate Scholars, etc. As a Dataseam scholar, I quickly became involved with the admissions department as a campus shadow host and student ambassador. University of Louisville does a magnificent job in welcoming future students and answering their questions. I have been honored to serve at college fairs and student panels to help parents and students alike prepare for the college transition and learn about opportunities available through programs like Dataseam. In 5 short years I have earned a B.S. and Masters of Engineering in Chemical Engineering and graduated debt-free. I thank Dataseam involvement in my education and helping utilize my time on campus. I am very thankful to enter the workforce without any student debts holding me back. I earned the W.S. Speed award for substantial contributions to the Speed School community as well as a J.B. Speed Alumni Award. I am chasing my dreams and becoming the adult and contributing citizen I am proud to be.

Not only has Dataseam been an inspiration and a foundational block in my education and successes, but it also allows opportunity for students like me to give back to the community, local universities, and the state as a whole. Dataseam has a strong role in supporting the local cancer centers and a well-known university presence. Dataseam seeks to educate the masses and support local families and schools and nourishing young minds to seek new and exciting careers of the future in engineering and scientific fields by helping them get grants and funding for higher education and new opportunities. I strongly urge you to continue the narrative of the hundreds of students, scholars, cancer patients, and engineers like myself that have benefitted from this company’s continual work.

Craig Aaron Roaden, Process Technician for Michelin North America

One Thousand Years of Cancer Research

In the first 70 days of the calendar year, the DataseamGrid completed over 1,000 years of critical cancer research.  Since January 1, 2017 researchers at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center have used this massive Kentucky cloud-based computing system to investigate tumor suppressor pathways, target specific genes and identify existing drugs that may be used to fight different cancers.

This unique computing system provides 40,000 Gigahertz of processing power from desktop computers sitting in 38 school systems across the state.  It extracts the maximum amount of computing power from every system around the clock, not only during evenings and weekends, but also between classes and other low use periods.

As one of the largest distributed computing systems in the world, it supplies twice the raw processing power of dedicated super computing at the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville combined[1].  If you purchased that much power from traditional cloud-based services, the state would have paid nearly $500,000 since early January[2].

Teams of Kentucky-based researchers have been looking at over 130 targets against their database of 25 million potential compounds to identify potential drugs.  They have also extended their search efforts to scan national databases of thousands of drugs including FDA approved drugs, to determine if some of those drugs might be useful against other types of cancers and different treatment programs.

The potential to repurpose existing medicines or substances may help get the benefits to people more quickly.  It is an area of focus for the NIH (National Institutes of Health) and University of Louisville cancer research teams are concentrating efforts in this area.

Supported and maintained across 38 school districts from Pikeville and Martin County in the east to Union and Crittenden Counties in the west, these 12,000 plus school computers take on these research requests that might consist of 50,000 individual tasks, with each task taking many hours to complete.  If local equipment, network or power conditions put a school or school system offline for any time, the system dynamically redirects tasks to other available computers so the important research marches on 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Dataseam developed and manages the DataseamGrid in collaboration with 38 Kentucky school districts. Dataseam also works with local school districts, universities and academies to promote STEM educated workforce, particularly in bio-medical research and aerospace industries.  Over 7,000 teachers and 90 technicians participate in training and industry-based certification programs as part of this effort.

[1] Computing power based on number of intel cores as documented at https://www.rc.uky.edu/high-performance-computing/hpc-hardware/ and http://louisville.edu/it/departments/research/cyberinfrastructure

[2] Calculated using http://calculator.s3.amazonaws.com